Bottle dating guide

12 Aug

Even given these descriptions beginning often mistake a machine made Owen ring on the base of a bottle with a pontil.

(Specifics on what a pontil looks like or how to tell the age based on the mold seam can be found in Bottle Basics.) While these two characteristics are often a strong clue to age, readers will be further helped by developing an understanding how the various categories of bottles changed over time.

The move also helps the Department of Interior (DOI) meet recent DOI Inspector General Evaluation Report (#2003-I-0051) recommendations to simplify their web presence, increase security, and control content, while still maintaining a recognizable connection to the Historic Bottle Website. What technology, techniques, or processes were used to manufacture the bottle? Where did the bottle come from, i.e., where was it made and/or used? Where can I go for more information on historic bottles? The opinions expressed on this website are those of the author/content manager of this website and not necessarily those of the Bureau of Land Management or Department of Interior.

- Field archaeologists trying to identify and date bottles or bottle fragments which are found during cultural surveys and excavations in the United States; - Educators dealing with the subject of historic archaeology; and - Bottle collectors and the general public trying to date a bottle, determine what it was used likely for, and/or begin their search for general information on historic bottles.

This complex of pages is a major hub of the rest of this website and the best place to start a search.

One can find quite a bit of information on my web site and across the Internet about dating bottles based on whether the mold seam goes up and over the lip or if the bottle has a 'pontil' on the base.▪ Field archaeologists trying to identify and date bottles or bottle fragments which are found during cultural surveys and excavations in the United States; ▪ Educators dealing with the subject of historical archaeology; and ▪ Collectors and the general public trying to date a bottle, determine what it was used likely for, and/or begin their search for information dealing with the fascinating world of historic bottles.Some of the embossed markings on the bottle base above are a great information source for 20th century bottle identification; some are meaningless.The "Bottle Typing/Diagnostic Shapes" complex of pages is in essence an on-line "type collection" of major bottles styles and types made from the late 18th through mid-20th centuries.Please note that the main "Bottle Typing/Diagnostic Shapes" page - and many of the subordinate pages - are very large with hundreds of imbedded images; it may take 20 to 30 seconds or more to load even with moderate to high speed internet connections.